Curriculum – P.E.

/ Children & Learning / The Curriculum / Curriculum – P.E.
Physical Education
Policy

The National Curriculum and Statutory Requirements

‘Pupils should develop fundamental movement skills, become increasingly competent and confident and access a broad range of opportunities to extend their agility, balance and coordination, individually and with others. They should be able to engage in competitive (both against self and against others) and co-operative physical activities, in a range of increasingly challenging situations.’ – The National Curriculum, 2013

Physical Education (P.E.) in primary school is statutory and the curriculum allowance for this subject should be a minimum of one hour per week in Key Stage 1 and two hours per week in Key Stage 2.

Aims

As a maintained school, our P.E. curriculum is based on the National Curriculum and reflects the statutory requirements therein. By the end of Key Stage 2, when children leave primary school for secondary education, all children should:

  • Develop competence to excel in a broad range of physical activities
  • Be physically active for sustained periods of time
  • Engage in competitive sports and activities
  • Lead healthy active lives

At Hawkhurst CEP School, we are committed to ensuring children learn how to be healthy and active from the earliest age and are well-supported in developing a broad range of skills in a variety of topics in P.E. lessons. Through their enjoyment of P.E. and the wide range of activities in dance, gymnastics, athletics, games, swimming and outdoor adventurous activities (OAA) we hope that children will develop a good repertoire of activities and sports that they enjoy and continue to be active and healthy throughout their lives.

Teaching and Learning

At Hawkhurst CEP School, P.E. is taught discretely by a specialist P.E. coach. In the EYFS, P.E. lessons focus on developing key physical skills and movements in dance, gymnastics, athletics and games. In Key Stage 1, children continue to learn P.E. through these topics but they begin to explore more challenging and complex skills and movements and develop their ability to evaluate and improve their work. In Key Stage 2, children continue to develop their knowledge and understanding of dance, gymnastics, athletics and games but they also take part in swimming and OAA lessons. Our children regularly take part in sporting events in which they compete with other local schools. We celebrate and share some of the skills we have been learning in P.E., largely in athletics, in the summer term at our annual sports day.

Each term, classes will make links between wheat they are learning in P.E. and the school value that the whole school is focussing on. Through this, children will develop a sense of the role that our school values play in both our curriculum and the whole school community, including our special place in the community of St Laurence Church.

We are committed to ensuring all children in our school have equal opportunities to access learning and lessons are planned and taught in line with our SEN and inclusion policies.

Recording and Assessment

At Hawkhurst CEP School, P.E. learning will be active and practical. Consequently, evidence of learning will largely be evident through observation and talking to the children. Occasionally, photographs of children’s learning may be taken and stored on the school network. Photographs of learning may also be displayed in the classroom environment or school displays.

Teachers will assess children’s work regularly and this will usually be through observation and feedback given orally during lessons. As P.E. lessons are generally taught by a P.E. specialist, teachers will observe a P.E. lesson on a termly basis to gather assessment data for the children in their class. Children’s progress will be checked against the skills progression documents for each year group.

Monitoring and Evaluating

The quality of education in history will be monitored by SLT and the P.E. curriculum team. Members of the curriculum team will carry our regular learning walks (each seasonal term) and will monitor progress throughout the school by checking the quality of learning opportunities and the standard of outcomes through observation and pupil conferencing.

The P.E. team will be responsible for managing the P.E. budget and ensuring teaching staff have sufficient resources to deliver high-quality P.E. lessons across the year.

Health and Safety

Should a child injure themselves in the course of a P.E. lesson, the school’s health and safety procedures should be followed. Assessment of injuries and first aid should only be undertaken by members of staff who hold relevant and up to date first aid qualifications.

Children must wear appropriate P.E. kit for P.E. lessons. If a child does not have the necessary kit, they can be expected to use spare P.E. kit from the school stock. Long hair must be tied back and all watches and jewellery removed for P.E. lessons.

Skills Progression

EYFS KS1 KS2
To show good control and coordination in large and small movements. They move confidently in a range of ways, safely negotiating space. They handle equipment and tools effectively, including pencils for writing.

To know the importance for good health of physical exercise, and a healthy diet, and talk about ways to keep healthy and safe.

To represent their own ideas, thoughts and feeling through design and technology, art, music, dance, role play and stories.

Pupils should be taught to:

  • Master basic movements including running, jumping, throwing and catching, as well as developing balance, agility and co-ordination, and begin to apply these in a range of activities
  • Participate in team games, developing simple tactics for attacking and defending
  • Perform dances using simple movement patterns.
Pupils should be taught to:

  • Use running, jumping, throwing and catching in isolation and in combination
  • Play competitive games, modified where appropriate [for example, badminton, basketball, cricket, football, hockey, netball, rounders and tennis], and apply basic principles suitable for attacking and defending
  • Develop flexibility, strength, technique, control and balance [for example, through athletics and gymnastics]
  • Perform dances using a range of movement patterns
  • Take part in outdoor and adventurous activity challenges both individually and within a team
  • Compare their performances with previous ones and demonstrate improvement to achieve their personal best.

EYFS Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Year 6
To describe how their body feels when still and when exercising.

To be able to join a range of different movements together.

To change the speed of their actions.

To change the style of their movements.

To create a short movement phrase, which demonstrates their own ideas.

To control their body when performing a sequence of movements.

To describe what they, and others, have done.

To describe how their body feels when still and when exercising.

To carry and place equipment safely.

To be able to copy and repeat actions.

To put a sequence of actions together to create a motif.

To vary the speed of their actions.

Use simple choreographic devices such as unison, canon and mirroring.

To begin to improvise independently to create a simple dance.

To perform using a range of actions and body parts with some coordination.

To begin to perform learnt skills with some control.

To watch and describe performances.

To begin to say how they could improve.

To recognize and describe how the body feels during and after different physical activities.

To explain what a body needs to stay healthy.

To copy, remember and repeat actions.

To create a short motif inspired by a stimulus.

To change the speed and level of their actions.

To use simple choreographic devices such as unison, canon and mirroring.

To use different transitions within a dance motif.

To move in time to music.

To improve the timing of their actions.

To perform sequences of their own composition with coordination.

To perform learnt skills with increasing control.

To compete against themselves and others.

To watch and describe performances and begin to evaluate their own performances.

To talk about the differences between their work and that of others.

To recognise and describe the effects of exercise on the body.

To know the importance of strength and flexibility for physical activity.

To explain why it is important to warm up and cool down.

To begin to improvise with a partner to create a simple dance.

To create motifs from different stimuli.

To begin to compare and adapt movements and motifs to create a larger sequence.

To use simple dance vocabulary to compare and improve their work.

To perform with some awareness of rhythm and expression.

To develop the quality of the actions in their performances.

To perform learnt skills and techniques with control and confidence.

To compete against themselves and others in a controlled manner.

To watch, describe and evaluate the effectiveness of a performance.

To describe how their performance has improved over time.

To describe how the body reacts at different times and how this affects performance.

To be able to explain why exercise is good for your health.

To know some reasons for warming up and cooling down.

To identify and repeat the movement patterns and actions of a chosen dance style.

To compose a dance that reflects the chosen dance style.

To confidently improvise with a partner or independently.

To compose longer dance sequences in a small group.

To demonstrate precision and some control in response to stimuli.

Begin to vary dynamics and develop actions and motifs in response to stimuli.

To demonstrate rhythm and spatial awareness.

To change parts of a dance as a result of self-evaluation.

To use simple subject-specific vocabulary when comparing and improving work.

To perform and create sequences with fluency and expression.

To perform and apply skills and techniques with control and accuracy.

To watch, describe and evaluate the effectiveness of performances, giving ideas for improvements.

To modify their use of skills or techniques to achieve a better result.

To know and understand the reasons for warming up and cooling down.

To explain some safety principles when preparing for and during exercise.

To identify and repeat the movement patterns and actions of a chosen dance style.

To compose individual, partner and group dances that reflect the chosen dance style.

To show a change of pace and timing in movements.

To develop an awareness of their use of space.

To demonstrate imagination and creativity in the movements they devise in response to stimuli.

To use transitions to link motifs smoothly together.

To improvise with confidence, still demonstrating fluency across the sequence.

To ensure their actions fir the rhythm of the music.

To modify parts of a sequence as a result of self and peer evaluation.

To use more complex dance vocabulary to compare and improve work.

To perform their own longer, more complex sequences in time to music.

To consistently perform and apply skills and techniques with accuracy and control.

To choose and use criteria to evaluate their own and others’ performances.

To explain why they have used particular skills or techniques, and the effect they have had on their performance.

To understand the importance of warming up and cooling down.

To carry out warm-ups and cool-downs safely and effectively.

To understand why exercise is good for health, fitness and wellbeing.

To know ways in which they can become healthier.

To identify and repeat the movement patterns and actions of a chosen dance style.

To compose individual, partner and group dances that reflect the chose dance style.

To use dramatic expression in dance movements and motifs.

To perform with confidence, using a range of movement patterns.

To demonstrate strong and controlled movements throughout a dance sequence.

To combine flexibility, techniques and movements to create a fluent sequence.

To move appropriate and with the required style in relation to the stimulus.

To show a change of pace and timing in movements.

To move rhythmically and accurately in dance sequences.

To improvise with confidence.

To dance with fluency and control, linking all movements and ensuring that transitions flow.

To demonstrate consistent precision.

To modify some elements of a sequence following self or peer evaluation.

To use complex dance vocabulary.

To link actions to create a complex sequence.

To perform the sequence in time to music.

To perform and apply a variety of skills and techniques confidently, consistently and with precision.

To thoroughly evaluate their own and others’ work.

EYFS Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Year 6
To be able to do a curled side roll, a log roll and a teddy bear roll.

To be able to do a straight jump, tuck jump, jumping jack and half turn jack.

To be able to do a bunny hop.

To be able to tiptoe, step, jump and hop.

To be able to complete some standing balances.

To control their body when performing a sequence of movements.

To participate in simple games.

To be able to do a log roll, curled side roll and teddy bear roll in a controlled way.

To be able to do a straight jump, tuck jump, jumping jack, half turn jump and a cat spring.

To be able to do a straight jump off a springboard.

To be able to do a bunny hop and a front support wheelbarrow with a partner.

To be able to tiptoe, step, jump, hop, hopscotch, skip and gallop.

To complete some standing balances, kneeling balances, pike, tuck, star, straight and straddle shapes.

To perform using a range of actions and body parts with some coordination.

To begin to perform learnt skills with some control.

To be able to do a controlled log roll, a controlled curled side roll, a controlled teddy bear roll, a rocking forward roll and a crouched forward roll.

To be able to do a straight jump, tuck jump, jumping jack, half turn jump, cat spring and a cat spring to straddle.

To be able to: hurdle step onto a springboard, straight jump off a springboard, tuck jump off a springboard.

To be able to bunny hop, do a front support wheelbarrow with a partner, a t-lever and a scissor kick.

To be able to tiptoe, step, jump, hop, hopscotch, skip, gallop and so a straight jump half-turn.

To complete some standing balances, kneeling balances, large body part balances, balances on apparatus, balances with a partner, pike, tuck, star, straight, straddle shapes and front and back support.

To perform sequences of their own composition with coordination and perform learnt skills with increasing control.

To be able to do a crouched forward roll, forward roll from standing and a tucked backward roll.

To be able to do a straight jump, tuck jump, jumping jack, star jump, straddle jump, pike jump, straight jump half-turn and a cat leap.

To be able to: hurdle step onto a springboard, squat on vault, star jump off, straddle jump off, pike jump off.

To be able to do a handstand and lunge into a handstand.

To be able to do a cartwheel.

To be able to tiptoe, step, jump, hop, hopscotch, skip, do chassis steps, straight jump half-turn and cat leap.

To completely large and small body part balances, standing and kneeling balances, balances on apparatus, matching and contrasting partner balances, pike, tuck, star, straight and straddle shapes and front and back support.

To develop the quality of their actions in performances.

To perform learnt skills with control and confidence and compete against themselves and others in a controlled manner.

To be able to do a forward roll from standing, a straddle forward roll, a tucked backward roll and a backward roll to straddle.

To be able to do a straight jump, tuck jump, jumping jack, star jump, straddle jump, pike jump, straight jump half-turn, straight jump full-turn, cat leap and a cat lead half-turn

To be able to: hurdle step onto a springboard, squat on vault, straddle on vault, star jump off, straddle jump off, pike jump off.

To lunge into a handstand and lunge into a cartwheel.

To be able to tiptoe, step, jump, hop, hopscotch, skip, do chassis steps, straight jump half-turn, straight jump full-turn, cat leap, cat leap half-turn and pivot.

To be able to carry out one, two, three and four point balances, balances on apparatus, balances with and against a partner, pike, tuck, star, straight, straddle shapes and front and back support.

Perform and create sequences with fluency and expression.

To perform and apply skills with control and accuracy.

To be able to do a forward roll from standing, a straddle forward roll, a pike forward roll, a tucked backward roll and a backward roll to straddle.

To be able to do a straight jump, tuck jump, jumping jack, star jump, straddle jump, pike jump, stag jump, straight jump half-turn, straight jump full-turn, cat leap, cat lead half-turn and a split leap.

To be able to: hurdle step onto a springboard, squat on vault, straddle on vault, star jump off, straddle jump off, pike jump off, squat through vault.

To lunge into a handstand, to lunge into a cartwheel, to lunge into a round-off.

To be able to tiptoe, step, jump, hop, hopscotch, skip, do chassis steps, straight jump half-turn, straight jump full-turn, cat leap, cat leap half-turn and pivot.

To be able to carry out one, two, three and four point balances, balances on apparatus, part body weight partner balances, pike, tuck, star, straight, straddle shapes and front and back support.

To perform their own longer, more complex sequences in time to music.

To consistently perform and apply skills with accuracy and control.

To be able to do a forward roll from standing, a straddle forward roll, a pike forward roll, a drive forward roll, a tucked backward roll, a backward roll to straddle, a backward roll to standing pike and a pike backward roll.

To be able to do a straight jump, tuck jump, jumping jack, star jump, straddle jump, pike jump, stag jump, straight jump half-turn, straight jump full-turn, cat leap, cat leap half-turn, split leap and stag leap.

To be able to: hurdle step onto a springboard, squat on vault, straddle on vault, star jump off, straddle jump off, pike jump off, squat through vault, straddle over vault.

To lunge into a cartwheel, lunge into a round-off, hurdle step, hurdle step into a cartwheel and hurdle step into a round-off.

To be able to tiptoe, step, jump, hop, hopscotch, skip, do chassis steps, straight jump half-turn, straight jump full-turn, cat leap, cat leap half-turn, cat leap full-turn and pivot.

To be able to carry out one, two, three and four point balances, balances on apparatus, part body weight partner balances, group formations, pike, tuck, star, straight, straddle shapes and front and back support.

To link actions to create a complex sequence, using a full range of movement that showcases different agilities, performed in time to music.

To consistently perform and apply skills with accuracy and control.

To begin to record their peers’ performances and evaluate these constructively.

EYFS Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Year 6
To describe how their body feels when still and when exercising.

To hit a ball with a bat or racquet.

To roll equipment in different ways.

To throw underarm, throw an object at a target and catch equipment using two hands.

To move a ball in different ways, including bouncing and kicking.

To use equipment to control a ball.

To kick an object at a target.

To move safely around the space and equipment.

To travel in different ways, including sideways and backwards.

To play a range of chasing games.

To follow simple rules.

To control their body when performing a sequence of movements.

To participate in simple games.

To describe how their body feels when still and when exercising.

To carry and place equipment safely.

To use hitting skills in a game.

To practice basic striking, sending and receiving.

To throw underarm and overarm.

To catch and bounce a ball.

To use rolling skills in a game.

To practice accurate throwing and consistent catching.

To travel with a ball in different ways and in different directions.

To pass the ball to another player in a game.

To use kicking skills in a game.

To use different ways of travelling in different directions or pathways.

To run at different speeds.

To begin to use space in a game.

To begin to use the terms attacking and defending.

To use simple defensive skills such as marking a player or defending a space.

To use simple attacking skills such as dodging to get past a defender.

To follow simple rules to play games, including team games.

To perform using a range of actions and body parts with some coordination.

To perform learnt skills with some control.

To engage in competitive activities and team games.

To recognize and describe how the body feels during and after different physical activities.

To explain what a body needs to stay healthy.

To strike or hit a ball with increasing control.

To learn skills for playing striking and fielding games.

To position the body well to strike a ball.

To throw different types of equipment in different ways, for accuracy and distance.

To throw, catch and bounce a ball with a partner.

To use throwing and catching skills in a game.

To throw a ball for distance.

To use hand-eye coordination to control a ball.

To vary the types of throw used.

To bounce and kick a ball while moving.

To use kicking and dribbling skills in a game.

To know how to pass the ball in different ways.

To use different ways of travelling at different speeds and following different pathways, directions or courses.

To change speed and direction while running.

To begin to choose and use the best space in a game.

To begin to use and understand the terms attacking and defending.

To use at least one technique to attack or defend to play a game successfully.

To understand the importance of rules in games.

To use at least one technique to attack or defend to play a game successfully.

To perform learnt skills with increasing control.

To compete against themselves and others.

To recognise and describe the effects of exercise on the body.

To know the importance of strength and flexibility for physical activity.

To explain why it is important to warm up and cool down.

To be able to demonstrate successful hitting and striking skills.

To develop a range of skills in striking and fielding.

To practice correct batting techniques and apply these to games.

To strike the ball for distance.

To throw and catch with greater control and accuracy.

To practice the correct technique for catching a ball and use it in a game.

To perform a range of catching and gathering skills with control and accuracy.

To throw a ball in different ways.

To develop a safe and effective overarm bowl.

To move with the ball in a variety of ways with some control.

To use two different ways of moving with a ball in a game.

To pass the ball in two different ways in a game situation.

To know how to keep and win back possession of the ball in a team game.

To find a useful space and use it to support teammates.

To use simple attacking and defending skills in a game.

To use fielding skills to stop a ball from travelling past them.

To apply and follow rules fairly.

To understand and begin to apply the basic principles of invasion games.

To know how to place a striking and fielding game fairly.

To compete against themselves and others in a controlled manner.

To watch, describe and evaluate the effectiveness of a performance.

To describe how the body reacts at different times and how this affects performance.

To be able to explain why exercise is good for your health.

To know some reasons for warming up and cooling down.

To use a bat, racquet or stick to hit a ball or shuttlecock with accuracy and control.

To accurately serve underarm.

To build a rally with a partner.

To use at least two different shots in a game situation.

To use hand-eye coordination to strike a moving and stationary ball.

To develop different ways of throwing and catching.

To move with the ball using a range of techniques showing control and fluency.

To pass the ball with increasing speed, accuracy and success in a game situation.

To occasionally contribute towards helping their team to keep and win back possession of the ball in a team game.

To make the best use of space to pass and receive the ball.

To use a range of attacking and defending techniques in a game.

To use fielding skills to prevent a player from scoring.

To vary the tactics used in a game.

To adapt rules to alter games.

To perform and apply skills and techniques with control and accuracy.

To take part in a range of competitive games and activities.

To modify their use of skills or techniques to achieve a better result.

To watch, describe and evaluate the effectiveness of a performance.

To know and understand the reasons for warming up and cooling down.

To explain some safety principles when preparing for and during exercise.

To use different techniques to hit a ball.

To identify and apply techniques for hitting a tennis ball.

To explore when different shots are best used.

To develop a backhand technique and use it in a game.

To practise techniques for all strokes.

To play a tennis game using an overhead serve.

To consolidate different ways of throwing and catching, and know when each is appropriate in a game.

To use a variety of ways to dribble in a game.

To use ball skills in different ways.

To pass a ball with speed and accuracy using appropriate techniques in a game situation.

To keep and win back possession of the ball effectively in a team game.

To demonstrate an increasing awareness of space.

To choose the best tactics for attacking and defending.

To shoot in a game.

To use fielding skills as a team to prevent the opposition from scoring.

To know when to pass and when to dribble in a game.

To devise and adapt rules to create their own game.

To consistently perform and apply skills and techniques with accuracy and control.

To take part in competitive games with a strong understand of tactics and composition.

To choose and use criteria to evaluate performances.

To explain why they have used particular skills or techniques, and the effect they have had on their performance.

To understand the importance of warming up and cooling down.

To carry out warm-ups and cool-downs safely and effectively.

To understand why exercise is good for health, fitness and wellbeing.

To know ways in which they can become healthier.

Hit a bowled ball over longer distances.

To use good hand-eye coordination to be able to direct a ball when striking or hitting.

To understand how to serve in order to start a game.

To throw and catch accurately and successfully under pressure in a game.

To show confidence in using ball skills in various ways in a game situation, and link these together effectively.

To choose and make the best pass in a game situation and link a range of skills together with fluency e.g. passing and receiving the ball on the move.

To keep and win back possession of the ball effectively and in a variety of ways in a team game.

To demonstrate a good awareness of space.

To think ahead and create a plan or attack or defence.

To apply their knowledge of the skills of attacking and defending.

To work as a team to develop fielding strategies to prevent the opposition from scoring.

To follow and create complex rules to play a game successfully.

To communicate plans to others during a game.

To lead others during a game.

To perform and apply a variety of skills and techniques confidently and with precision.

To take part in competitive games with a strong understanding of tactics and composition.

To thoroughly evaluate their own and others work, suggesting thoughtful and appropriate improvements.

EYFS Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Year 6
To run in different ways for a variety of purposes.

To jump in a range of ways, landing safely.

To roll equipment in different ways.

To throw underarm.

To throw an object at a target.

To control their body when performing a sequence of movements.

To participate in simple games.

To talk about what they, and others, have done.

To vary their pace and speed when running.

To run with a basic technique over different distances.

To show good posture and balance.

To jog in a straight line.

To change direction when jogging.

To sprint in a straight line.

To change direction when sprinting.

To maintain control as they change direction.

To perform different types of jumps e.g. two feet to two feet, two feet to one foot etc.

To perform a short jumping sequence.

To jump as high and as far as possible.

To land safely and with control.

To work with a partner to develop the control of their jumps.

To throw underarm and overarm.

To throw a ball towards a target with increasing accuracy.

To improve the distance they can throw by using more power.

To being to perform learnt skills with some control.

To engage in competitive activities and team games.

To run at different paces and describe them.

To use a range of different stride lengths.

To travel at different speeds.

To begin to select the most suitable pace and speed for distance.

To complete an obstacle course.

To vary the speed and direction in which they are travelling.

To run following a curved line.

To be able to run over different distances.

To perform and compare different types of jumps e.g. two feet to two feet, two feet to one foot etc.

To combine different jumps with some fluency and control.

To jump for distance from a standing position.

To choose the most appropriate jumps to cover different distances.

To know that the leg muscles are used when performing a jumping action.

To throw different types of equipment in different ways for accuracy and distance.

To throw with accuracy at targets of different heights.

To investigate ways to alter their throwing technique to achieve greater distance.

To identify and demonstrate how different techniques can affect their performance.

To focus on their arm and leg action to improve their sprinting technique.

To begin to combine running with jumping over hurdles.

To understand the importance of adjusting running pace to suit the distance being run.

To use one and two feet to take off and land.

To develop an effective take-off for the standing long jump.

To develop an effective flight phase for the standing long jump.

To land safely and with control.

To throw with greater control and accuracy.

To show increasing control in their overarm throw.

To perform a push throw.

To continue to develop techniques to throw for increased distance.

To confidently demonstrate an improved technique for sprinting.

To carry out an effective sprint finish.

To perform a relay, focusing on the baton changeover technique.

To speed up and slow down smoothly.

To learn how to combine a hop, step and jump to perform the standing triple jump.

To land safely and with control.

To begin to measure the distance jumped.

To perform a pull throw.

To measure the distance of their throws.

To continue to develop techniques to throw even greater distances.

To accelerate from a variety of starting positions and select their favourite.

To identify their reaction times when performing a sprint start.

To continue to practise and refine their technique for sprinting, focusing on an effective sprint start.

To select the most suitable pace for the distance and their fitness level.

To identify and demonstrate stamina, explaining its importance for runners.

To improve techniques for jumping for distance.

To perform an effective standing long jump.

To perform a standing triple jump.

To perform a standing vertical jump.

To land safely and with control.

To measure the distance and height jumped with accuracy.

To investigate different jumping techniques.

To perform a fling throw.

To throw a variety of implements using a range of throwing techniques.

To measure and record the distance of their throws.

To continue to develop techniques to throw for greater distances.

To recap, practice and refine an effective sprinting technique, including reaction time.

To build speed up quickly for a sprint finish.

To run over hurdles with fluency, focusing on the lead leg technique and a consistent stride pattern.

To accelerate to pass over competitors.

To work as a team to competitively perform a relay.

To confidently and independently select the most appropriate pace for different distances and different parts of a run.

To demonstrate endurance and stamina over longer distances in order to maintain a sustained run.

To develop their technique for the standing vertical jump.

To maintain control at each of the different stages of the triple jump.

To land safely and with control.

Develop and improve techniques for jumping for height and distance.

To perform and apply different types of jumps in other contexts.

To set up and lead jumping activities including measuring jumps with confidence and accuracy.

To perform a heave throw.

To measure and record the distance of their throws.

To continue to develop techniques to throw for increased distance and support others in improving their personal best.

To develop and refine techniques to throw for accuracy.

To perform a heave throw.

To measure and record the distance of their throws.

To continue to develop techniques to throw for increased distance and support others in improving their personal best.

To develop and refine techniques to throw for accuracy.

EYFS Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Year 6
To know the importance of strength and flexibility for physical activity.

To orientate themselves with increasing confidence and accuracy around a short trail.

To identify and use effective communication to begin to work as a team.

To identify symbols used on a key.

To begin to choose equipment that is appropriate for an activity.

To communicate with others.

To begin to complete activities in a set period of time.

To begin to offer an evaluation of personal performances and activities.

To orientate themselves with accuracy around a short trail.

To create a short trail for others with a physical challenge.

To start to recognise features of an orienteering course.

To communicate clearly with other people in a team, and with other teams.

To have experience of a range of roles within a team and begin to identify the key skills required to succeed at each.

To associate the meaning of a key in the context of the environment.

To try a range of equipment for creating and completing an activity.

To make an informed decision on the best equipment to use for an activity.

To plan and organise a trail that others can follow.

To communicate clearly with others.

To work as part of a team.

To begin to use a map to complete an orienteering course.

To complete an orienteering course more than once and identify ways of improving completion time.

To offer an evaluation of both personal performances and activities.

To start to improve trails to increase the challenge of the course.

To explain some safety principles when preparing for and during exercise.

To start to orientate themselves with increasing confidence and accuracy around a course.

To design an orienteering course that can be followed and offers some challenge to others.

To begin to use navigation equipment to orientate around a trail.

To use clear communication effectively complete a particular role in a team.

To complete orienteering activities both as part of a team and independently.

To identify a key on a map and begin to use the information in activities.

To choose the best equipment for an outdoor activity.

To create an outdoor activity that challenges others.

To create a simple plan of an activity for others to follow.

To identify the quickest route to accurately navigate an orienteering course.

To communicate clearly and effectively with others.

To work effectively as part of a team.

To successfully use a map to complete an orienteering course.

To begin to use a compass for navigation.

To complete an orienteering course on multiple occasions, in a quicker time due to improved technique.

To offer a detailed and effective evaluation of both personal performances and activities.

To improve a trail to increase the challenge of the course.

To orientate themselves with confidence and accuracy around a course when under pressure.

To design an orienteering course that is clear to follow and offers challenge to others.

To use navigation equipment to improve the trail.

To use clear communication to effectively complete a particular role in a team.

To compete in orienteering activities both as part of a team and independently.

To use a range of map styles and make an informed decision on the most effective.

To choose the best equipment for an outdoor activity.

To prepare an orienteering course for others to follow.

To identify the quickest route to accurately navigate an orienteering course.

To manage an orienteering event for others to compete in.

To communicate clearly and effectively with others when under pressure.

To work effectively as part of a team, demonstrating leadership skills when necessary.

To successfully use a map to complete an orienteering course.

To use a compass for navigation.

To organise an even for others.

To complete an orienteering course on multiple occasions, in a quicker time due to improved technique.

To offer a detailed and effective evaluation of both person performances and activities with an aim of increasing challenge and improving performance.

To listen to feedback and improve an orienteering course from it.

Enrichment Activities
Coming Soon