Curriculum – History

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History

Policy

The National Curriculum and Statutory Requirements

‘A high-quality history education will help pupils gain a coherent knowledge and understanding of Britain’s past and that of the wider world. It should inspire pupils’ curiosity to know more about the past. Teaching should equip pupils to ask perceptive questions, think critically, weigh evidence, sift arguments, and develop perspective and judgement. History helps pupils to understand the complexity of people’s lives, the process of change, the diversity of societies and relationships between different groups, as well as their own identity and the challenges of their time.’– The National Curriculum, 2013

As a maintained school, our history curriculum is based on the National Curriculum and reflects the statutory requirements therein. By the end of Key Stage 2, all children should:

  • Know and understand the history of the United Kingdom as a coherent, chronological narrative: how people’s lives have shaped the nation and how Britain influenced and been influenced by the wider world
  • Know and understand significant aspects of world history: ancient civilisations, empires, non-European societies
  • Gain and deploy a historically grounded understanding of abstract terms such as ‘empire’, ‘civilisation’, ‘parliament’ and ‘peasantry’
  • Understand historical concepts such as continuity and change, cause and consequence, similarity, difference and significance, and use them to make connections, draw contrasts, analyse trends, frame historically-valid questions and create their own structured accounts, including written narratives and analyses
  • Understand the methods of historical enquiry, including how evidence is used rigorously to make historical claims, and discern how and why contrasting arguments and interpretations of the past have been constructed
  • Gain historical perspective by placing their growing knowledge into different contexts, understanding the connections between local, regional, national and international history; between cultural, economic, military, political, religious and social history; and between short- and long-term timescales

Aims

At Hawkhurst CEP School we strongly believe that all children should have access to an engaging and high-quality history curriculum that provides them with an understanding of chronology, how people’s lives have changed over time and an understanding of the significant human achievements, follies and events in the history of both Britain and the wider world. We expect all children to develop a keen understanding of people, places and events in a wide variety of contexts, cultures and environments. As children progress through the school, we aim for them to develop an ability to be critical in their study of history; to understand that historical knowledge and understanding comes from a wide range of sources of varying reliability and the ways in which people construct the past are subjective and liable to evolve over time. Fundamentally, we want our pupils to enjoy finding out about the past, how it influences our lives today and relish in the discovery of rich stories of humans from around the world.

Teaching and Learning

At Hawkhurst CEP School, history is taught through a creative, topic-based curriculum. Each year group will cover the skills as detailed in our skills progression document for history. In the EYFS, children’s learning in history will primarily focus on developing an understanding of change over time, learning about past events in children’s own lives and the lives of people close to them and considering the meaning of old and new. In Key Stage 1, children will develop their understanding of chronology by learning about famous people and key events in the history of Britain and the wider world. They will begin to understand how people’s lives have changed over time and develop their ability to consider historical information and ask and answer questions. In Key Stage 2, children will develop a clear understanding chronology, including how the story of humans has spanned from the stone age to ancient civilizations and ultimately to the modern era. They will be able to use this understanding to place key events on a timeline of human history and be able to talk about significant historical figures, events and vocabulary related to the historical topic being studied. As children progress through Key Stage 2, they will begin to evaluate and consider the reliability of historical sources and think carefully and critically about how we learn about the past.

In addition to providing thorough skills coverage, history topics are selected to ensure that there is full coverage of the National Curriculum programme of study for history throughout the school. Careful consideration is also given to how well the topics support the children to develop their sense of chronology, knowledge acquisition and historical vocabulary. Teachers will, therefore, collaborate to ensure that the topics covered in the history curriculum at Hawkhurst CEP School, and the year group in which they are studied, support the most comprehensive and cohesive delivery of the skills and knowledge pupils need to prepare them for further study of history in secondary school.

Each term, classes will make links between what they are learning in history and the school value that the whole school is focussing on. Through this, children will develop a sense of the role that our school values play in both our curriculum and the whole school community, including our special place in the community of St Laurence Church.

We are committed to ensuring all children in our school have equal opportunities to access learning and lessons are planned and taught in line with our SEN and inclusion policies.

Recording and Assessment

At Hawkhurst CEP School, children in the EYFS will generally express their historical understanding through child-initiated activities and talk. This may then be recorded by adults e.g. on a post-it and filed in their learning journey. In Key Stage 1, children will begin to record their history learning in their topic exercise books but will often explore historical ideas and events practically, which may then be recorded with photographs and post-its in their topic books with opportunities for longer pieces of writing as they progress through the key stage. In Key Stage 2, children’s work will be recorded in their topic books and children will demonstrate their understanding of history increasingly through written outcomes, some of which should be extended pieces of writing. Learning at all phases of primary education will also be evidenced in the learning environment e.g. on learning walls and displays.

Teachers will assess children’s work regularly and this will usually be through observation and feedback given orally during lessons but, as children progress through Key Stage 2, may increasingly be conducted through feedback in line with our feedback policy for extended pieces of writing. Children’s progress will be checked the against the intended knowledge to be learned and the skills progression documents for each year group.

Monitoring and Evaluating

The quality of education in history will be monitored by SLT and the history subject leader. The subject leader will carry our regular learning walks (each seasonal term) and will monitor progress throughout the school by checking the quality of learning opportunities and the standard of outcome through work scrutinies and pupil conferencing.

The subject leader will be responsible for managing the history budget and ensuring classes have sufficient resources to deliver high-quality history lessons across the year.

Skills Progression

EYFS KS1 KS2
To talk about past events in their own lives and in the lives of family members.

To know about similarities and differences between themselves and others, and among families, communities and traditions.

To know about similarities and differences in relation to places, objects, materials and living things.

To talk about the features of their own immediate environment and how environments might vary from one another.

Pupils should be taught about:

  • Changes within living memory. Where appropriate, these should be used to reveal aspects of change in national life
  • Events beyond living memory that are significant nationally or globally [for example, the Great Fire of London, the first aeroplane flight or events commemorated through festivals or anniversaries]
  • The lives of significant individuals in the past who have contributed to national and international achievements. Some should be used to compare aspects of life in different periods [for example, Elizabeth I and Queen Victoria, Christopher Columbus and Neil Armstrong, William Caxton and Tim Berners-Lee, Pieter Bruegel the Elder and LS Lowry, Rosa Parks and Emily Davison, Mary Seacole and/or Florence Nightingale and Edith Cavell]
  • Significant historical events, people and places in their own locality
Pupils should be taught about:

  • Changes in Britain from the Stone Age to the Iron Age
  • The Roman Empire and its impact on Britain
  • Britain’s settlement by Anglo-Saxons and Scots
  • The Viking and Anglo-Saxon struggle for the Kingdom of England to the time of Edward the Confessor
  • A local history study
  • A study of an aspect or theme in British history that extends pupils’ chronological knowledge beyond 1066
  • The achievements of the earliest civilizations – an overview of where and when the first civilizations appeared and a depth study of one of the following: Ancient Sumer; The Indus Valley; Ancient Egypt; The Shang Dynasty of Ancient China
  • Ancient Greece – a study of Greek life and achievements and their influence on the western world
  • A non-European society that provides contrasts with British history – one study chosen from: early Islamic civilization, including a study of Baghdad c. AD 900; Mayan civilization c. AD 900; Benin (West Africa) c. AD 900-1300

EYFS Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Year 6
To develop an understanding of growth, decay and changes over time. Describe changes in living memory.

Describe historical events significant to the local area.

Use a range of words relating to time – before, after, old, older, oldest.

With support, place the time studied on a timeline.

Use phrases related to the passing of time e.g. a very long time ago, began, first, next, then, after, at last, finally, year, decade, century.

Describe significant events both nationally and globally beyond living memory.

Sequence several events of artefacts.

Place the period studied on a timeline.

Use key dates and terms related to the passing of time e.g. BC/AD.

Place events from the period studied on a timeline.

Use key dates to describe events.

Understand the terns ancient/modern and begin to sequence major historical periods.

Know and sequence key events of a time studied.

Relate current studies to previous studies.

Use relevant terms and begin to know and use key dates.

Place people into correct periods of time.

Sequence up to ten events on a timeline.

Identify changes over a period of time.

Use relevant dates and terms.

Know key dates, characters and events of the time studied.

Show an understanding of the history of Britain in relations to the wider world.

EYFS Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Year 6
To comment and ask questions about aspects of their familiar world, such as the place where they live or the natural world.

To look closely at similarities, differences, patterns and change.

Begin to find answers to simple questions about the past from historical sources. Answer questions about the past by making simple observations from historical sources. Ask and answer questions about the past using historical sources.

Begin to select relevant historical information.

Begin to select and combine information from historical sources. Begin to evaluate, select and combine information from historical sources. Evaluate sources of information and identify those relevant/useful to particular tasks.

EYFS Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Year 6
To show an interest in the lives of people who are familiar to them.

To recognise and describe special times or events for family or friends.

To show interest in different occupations and ways of life.

To know some of the things that make them unique, and to talk about some of the similarities and differences in relation to friends or family.

Identify major differences between life in different periods.

Using sources (e.g. artefact, photo, story, firsthand account) – handle, observe, sketch ask and answer questions.

Explain similarities and differences between life in different periods.

Infer things about the past by looking at pictures and artefacts.

Understand that there are different types of evidence that tell us about the past.

Begin to recognise the motivations of those in the past.

Show understanding of the concepts of similarities and differences between life in the same period.

Recount the life of a historically significant figure or event in detail, selecting information.

Give reasons for some of the actions of a historically significant figure.

Understand that events from the past still affect some people today.

Show understanding of the significance of events from the past on life today.

Compare and contrast aspects of the past with aspects of life today.

Know that the lives of people in a historical period were not all the same.

Give reasons why key events happened or people acted as they did.

Show an understanding of the concept of cause and consequence through the events studied.

Describe some of the main events, people and changes in a period.

Consider interpretations of an event by looking at other information.

Show an understanding on the concept of developmental change through an aspect studied.

Find out about beliefs in different civilisations and link this to their actions.

Give reasons for and the results of the main events and changes in a period.

Look at different points of view to find out about different versions of historical events.

Evaluate sources of information and say which would be more reliable.

EYFS Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Year 6
To remember and talk about significant events in their own experiences.

To talk about some of the things they have observed e.g. plants, animals, natural and found objects.

To talk about why things happen and how things worth.

 Describe historical events linked to the local area

Describe artefacts that are from the past.

Speak about how items from the past were used.

Use historical vocabulary appropriate to the ages and year group of the children.

Use labelled diagrams, recounts and pictures to tell us what they know about the past.

Annotate photographs.

Use historical vocabulary appropriate to the year group.

Describe events of the life of a historically significant figure.

Communicate knowledge and understanding in a variety of ways appropriate to the child’s year group e.g. discussions, recounts, diaries, pictures, annotations, drama.

Use historical vocabulary appropriate to the child’s year group.

Year 3 skills buts with greater independence and depth:

Communicate knowledge and understanding in a variety of ways appropriate to the child’s year group e.g. discussions, recounts, diaries, pictures, annotations, drama.

Use historical vocabulary appropriate to the child’s year group.

Independently and with increased confidence and sophistication:

Communicate knowledge and understanding in a variety of ways appropriate to the child’s year group e.g. discussions, recounts, diaries, pictures, annotations, drama.

Use historical vocabulary appropriate to the child’s year group.

Independently and with increased confidence and sophistication:

Communicate knowledge and understanding in a variety of ways appropriate to the child’s year group e.g. discussions, recounts, diaries, pictures, annotations, drama.

Use historical vocabulary appropriate to the child’s year group.

Enrichment Activities
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