Curriculum – English

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English
Policy

The National Curriculum and Statutory Requirements

 ‘English has a pre-eminent place in education and in society. A high-quality education in English will teach pupils to speak and write fluently so that they can communicate their ideas and emotions to others and through their reading and listening, others can communicate with them. Through reading in particular, pupils have a chance to develop culturally, emotionally, intellectually, socially and spiritually. Literature, especially, plays a key role in such development. Reading also enables pupils both to acquire knowledge and to build on what they already know. All the skills of language are essential to participating fully as a member of society; pupils, therefore, who do not learn to speak, read and write fluently and confidently are effectively disenfranchised.’ – The National Curriculum, 2013

All pupils are expected to know, apply and understand the knowledge, skills and processes in each programme of study in the English National Curriculum: spoken language, reading and writing.

At the end of each key stage children will complete statutory assessments in English, the results of which are reported. In the EYFS, this is will be a teacher assessed judgement informed by observations, children’s work and moderated with other practitioners. In the summer of Year 2 children will sit the Key Stage 1 SATs reading and GPS assessments and the class teacher will award a level of attainment in writing, which will be moderated with other practitioners. In Year 6 children will sit the Key Stage 2 SATs reading and GPS assessments and the class teacher will award a level of attainment in writing, which will be moderated with other practitioners. Additionally, children will complete the phonics screening check to assess their level of phonic decoding at the end of Year 1.

Aims

As a maintained school, our English curriculum is based on the National Curriculum and reflects the statutory requirements therein. By the end of Key Stage 2, all children should:

  • Read easily, fluently and with good understanding
  • Develop the habit of reading widely and often, for both pleasure and information
  • Acquire a wide vocabulary, an understanding of grammar and knowledge of linguistic conventions for reading, writing and spoken language
  • Appreciate our rich and varied literary heritage
  • Write clearly, accurately and coherently, adapting their language and style in and for a range of contexts, purposes and audiences
  • Use discussion in order to learn; they should be able to elaborate and explain clearly their understanding and ideas
  • Are competent in the arts of speaking and listening, making formal presentations, demonstrating to others and participating in debate

At Hawkhurst CEP School, we are committed to ensuring every child leaves primary school with a high level of literacy, including spoken language, which is essential to success at later stages of their education and in their adult life. We also want to foster a love of language, expression and literature and encourage children to regularly read for pleasure. We have high expectations of children’s writing across the curriculum and work hard to ensure children write with both creativity and accuracy. We passionately believe that a literature and language rich environment in early childhood is fundamental to children flourishing in their learning across the curriculum and supports them in being successful learners in primary school and beyond.

Teaching and Learning

At Hawkhurst CEP School we follow several high-quality schemes of learning to enrich our English provision. We use the CLPE’s Power of Reading scheme of learning in English lessons and use this to guide much of our teaching of reading and writing throughout the school and, indeed, to make links with learning in the wider curriculum. In the EYFS and Key Stage 1, Read Write Inc is used to teach phonics. Throughout the school, Spelling Shed and the Kent activity planners inform the teaching of grammar, punctuation and spelling (GPS), among other resources and teaching approaches. We follow Letter-join to teach handwriting and the expectation is that all children from Year 1 regularly practise and use cursive handwriting in their written work.

Spoken language

Spoken language plays a significant role both in the English curriculum at Hawkhurst CEP School and throughout all areas of learning. Classrooms are language rich environments where children are encouraged to speak to each other and broaden their range of vocabulary. In lessons, spoken language plays a fundamental role in children being able to orally rehearse before writing, take part in discussions, performances, role play and drama. All adults in school model a good level of spoken English and are conscious of the need to expose children to rich and varied vocabulary and Standard English to support their spoken language development and, therefore, their reading and writing.

Reading

Children in all year groups at Hawkhurst CEP School are exposed to a wide range of high-quality texts in their learning environments, both through being read to by adults (which takes place daily) and by having access to high-quality book selections in classroom reading areas and the school library. All members of staff at Hawkhurst are committed to fostering a lifelong love of literature in the children in our care and regularly model their own enjoyment of reading and love of books.

In the EYFS and Year 1 the teaching of word reading take place through phonics teaching and we use the scheme Read Write Inc to achieve this. Children demonstrate their understanding of the text through discussion of what they have read and what has been read to them and are encouraged to draw on other strategies to make meaning when reading, such as context and picture cues.

From Year 2, most children no longer take part in discrete phonics teaching and their word reading continues to be developed through group and whole class reading lessons and 1:1 reading to adults where appropriate. Children in Year 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 and encouraged to demonstrate thorough comprehension of what they have read and what has been read to them using a range of strategies such as retrieval, inference, sequencing, summarising and prediction. They are also encouraged to explore the meaning of a any new vocabulary they encounter.

All English lessons are based around high-quality texts and listening to stories, discussing texts and sharing ideas around children’s literature form key elements in English teaching at Hawkhurst CEP School.

Children are expected to read or share books daily at home. This will look different for children in different year groups. In the EYFS and Year 1 children should share a book beyond their decoding level with an adult at home and read aloud a book at an appropriate phonic level. From Year 2, children should continue to share ambitious texts with adults at home and read aloud texts at an appropriate decoding level, however, as children become more fluent readers their home reading may be increasingly independent.

Writing

Children begin to learn to write by mark marking in the EYFS through play and child-initiated activities. They are then taught to form letters correctly and begin to write their names, phonically regular and common exception words and ultimately simple sentences by the end of reception.

Children are provided with opportunities to write at length across the curriculum and it is important that children have experience of writing for a wide range of purposes and to a high standard in all subjects. In English lessons, children write in a wide range of genres and writing is developed through shared, guided writing, and independent and extended writing opportunities.

Children are encouraged to take ownership of their writing progress, throughout the school, by regularly redrafting, proof-reading and editing their work in line with our feedback policy. When children have completed an independent, extended piece of writing feedback will often be given through whole class feedback following regular verbal feedback within lessons. Pupils will then use this to edit and improve their writing, making small changes using a purple pen and rewriting larger passages using editing flaps.

All children at Hawkhurst CEP School take part in a daily English lesson, a daily reading lesson and daily GPS provision. Spelling is taught in class through Spelling Shed and activities are regularly set on this platform for home learning and consolidation opportunities.

Children regularly practise handwriting in all year groups. In Key Stage 2 this is sometimes practised alongside spelling.

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Each term, classes will make links between what they are learning in English and the school value that the whole school is focussing on. Through this, children will develop a sense of the role that our school values play in both our curriculum and the whole school community, including our special place in the community of St Laurence Church.

We are committed to ensuring all children in our school have equal opportunities to access learning and lessons are planned and taught in line with our SEN and inclusion policies.

Recording and Assessment

At Hawkhurst CEP School, children’s learning in English will generally be recorded in their English exercise books. Class teachers will create a class journal for each Power of Reading text and shared work, notes and observations will sometimes be recorded in this.

Teachers will assess children’s work regularly and this will be in an age-appropriate way and in line with our feedback policy. Termly assessments will be uploaded to Target Tracker and data will be analysed by SLT.

Children will have a clear understanding of how to improve their work through regular discussion with class teachers and teaching assistants.

Monitoring and Evaluating

The quality of education in English will be monitored by SLT and the English subject leader. The subject leader will carry our regular learning walks (each seasonal term) and will monitor progress throughout the school by checking the quality of learning opportunities and the standard of outcomes through observation, work scrutinies, data analysis and pupil conferencing.

The subject leader will be responsible for managing the English budget to ensure classes have sufficient resources to deliver high-quality English lessons across the year.

Skills Progression

EYFS KS1 KS2
To use phonic knowledge to decode regular words and read them accurately.

To read some common irregular words.

To read and understand simple sentences.

To listen to stories, accurately anticipating key events and responding to what they hear with relevant comments, questions or actions.

To demonstrate understanding when talking with other about what they have read.

To answer ‘how and ‘why’ questions about their experiences and in response to stories or events.

To express themselves effectively, showing awareness of listeners’ needs.

 

By the end of Key Stage 1 all pupils should be able to:

  • Read accurately most words of two or more syllables
  • Read most words containing common suffixes
  • Read most common exception words.

In age-appropriate1 books, the pupils can:

  • Read most words accurately without overt sounding and blending, and sufficiently fluently to allow them to focus on their understanding rather than on decoding individual words
  • Sound out most unfamiliar words accurately, without undue hesitation.

 

In a book that they can already read fluently, the pupil can:

  • Check it makes sense to them, correcting any inaccurate reading
  • Answer questions and make some inferences
  • Explain what has happened so far in what they have read

 

At the end of KS2, children are assessed against the expected standard for reading in the SATs examinations which take place in May of Year 6.

These examinations assess the skills and knowledge children have acquired in Years 3, 4, 5 and 6 as detailed below.

EYFS Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Year 6
To enjoy rhyming and rhythmic activities.

To show an awareness of rhyme and alliteration.

To recognise rhythms in spoken words.

To continue a rhyming string.

To hear and say the initial sound in words.

To segments the sounds in simple words and blend them together and know which letter represents some of them.

To link sounds to letters, naming and sounding the letters of the alphabet.

To use phonic knowledge to decode regular words and read them accurately.

To read some common irregular words.

To recognise familiar words and signs, such as their own name and logos.

To begin to read words and simple sentences.

To begin to break the flow of speech into words.

To apply phonic knowledge and skills as the route to decode words.

To respond speedily with the correct sound to graphemes for all 40+ phonemes, including, where applicable, alternative sounds for graphemes.

To read accurately by blending sounds in unfamiliar words containing GPCs that have been taught.

Read common exception words, noting unusual correspondences between spelling and sound and where these occur in the word.

Read words containing taught GPCs and -s, -es, -ing, -ed, -er and -est endings.

Read other words of more than one syllable that contain taught GPCs.

To be able to read words with contractions e.g. I’m, can’t, we’ll.

To understand that an apostrophe in a contractions represents omitted letters.

To read aloud accurately books that are consistent with their developing phonic knowledge and that do not require them to use other strategies to work out words.

To re-read familiar books to build up their fluency and confidence in word reading.

 

Children should continue to apply phonic knowledge and skills as the route to decode words until automatic decoding has become embedded and reading is fluent.

To be able read accurately by blending the sounds in words that contain the graphemes taught so far, especially recognizing alternative sounds for graphemes.

To read accurately words of two or more syllables that contain the same graphemes as above.

To read words containing common suffixes.

To read further common exception words, noting unusual correspondences between spelling and sound and where these occur in the word.

To be able to read further common exception words, noting unusual correspondences between spelling and sound and where these occur in the word.

To read further common exception words, noting unusual correspondences between spelling and sound and where these occur in the word.

To read most words quickly and accurately, without overt sounding and blending, when these have been frequently encountered.

To read aloud books closely matched to their improving phonic knowledge, sounding out unfamiliar words accurately, automatically and without undue hesitation.

To re-read familiar books to build up their fluency and confidence in word reading.

 

Skills in LKS2 will be introduced in Year 3 and revisited in Year 4 to provide children with the opportunity to master the skills taught before transitioning to UKS2.

Children should apply their growing knowledge of root words, prefixes and suffixes (etymology and morphology) as listed in the National Curriculum English Appendix 1, both to read aloud and to understand the meaning of new words they meet.

Children should read further exception words, noting the unusual correspondences between spelling and sound, and where these occur in the word.

In Year 4 children will revisit the skills introduced in Year 3 to build confidence, independence and mastery.

Children should apply their growing knowledge of root words, prefixes and suffixes (etymology and morphology) as listed in the National Curriculum English Appendix 1, both to read aloud and to understand the meaning of new words they meet.

Children should read further exception words, noting the unusual correspondences between spelling and sound, and where these occur in the word.

 

Skills in UKS2 will be introduced in Year 5 and revisited in Year 6 to provide children with the opportunity to master the skills taught before transitioning to UKS2.

Children should be able to apply their growing knowledge of root words, prefixes and suffixes (morphology and etymology) as listed in the National Curriculum English Appendix 1, both to read aloud and to understand the meaning of new words that they meet.

 

In Year 6 children will revisit the skills introduced in Year 5 to build confidence, independence and mastery to ensure they are fully prepared for transition to secondary school.

Children should be able to apply their growing knowledge of root words, prefixes and suffixes (morphology and etymology) as listed in the National Curriculum English Appendix 1, both to read aloud and to understand the meaning of new words that they meet.

EYFS Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Year 6
To show an interest in illustrations and print in books and print in the environment.

To look at books independently.

To handle books carefully.

To hold books the right way up and turn pages.

To ascribe meanings to marks that they see in different places.

To read and understand simple sentences.

To know that print carries meaning and, in English, is read from left to right and top to bottom.

To understand humour e.g. nonsense rhymes, jokes.

To listen to stories with increasing attention and recall.

To begin to be aware of the way stories are structured.

To describe main story settings, events and principle characters.

To follow a story without pictures or props.

To enjoy an increasing range of books.

To listen to stories, accurately anticipating key events and responding to what they hear with relevant comments, questions or actions.

To demonstrate understanding when talking with other about what they have read.

To use vocabulary and forms of speech that are increasingly influences by their experiences of books.

To suggest how a story might end.

To begin to understand ‘how’ and ‘why’ questions.

To answer ‘how and ‘why’ questions about their experiences and in response to stories or events.

To listen and join in with stories and poems, both 1:1 and in small groups.

To join in with repeated refrains in rhymes and stories.

To use intonation, rhythm and phrasing to make the meaning clear to others.

To develop preference for forms of expression.

to act out a narrative.

To know that information can be relayed in the form of print.

To know that information can be retrieved from books and computers.

To develop pleasure in reading, motivation to read, vocabulary and understanding by:

  • Listening to and discussing a wide range of poems, stories and non-fiction at a level beyond that at which they can read independently.
  • Being encouraged to link what they read or hear read to their own experiences.
  • Becoming very familiar with key stories, fairy stories and traditional tales, retelling them and considering their particular characteristics.
  • Recognising and joining in with predictable phrases.
  • Learning to appreciate rhymes and poems, and to recite some by heart.
  • Discussing word meanings, linking new meanings to those already known.

Understand both the books they can already read accurately and fluently and those they listen to by:

  • Drawing on what they already know or on background information and vocabulary provided by the teacher.
  • Checking that the text makes sense to them as they read and correcting inaccurate reading.
  • Discussing the significance of the title and events.
  • Making inferences on the basis of what is being said and done.
  • Predicting what might happen on the basis of what has been read so far.

Participate in discussion about what is read to them, taking turns and listening to what others say.

Explain clearly their understanding of what is read to them.

To develop pleasure in reading, motivation to read, vocabulary and understanding by:

  • Listening to and discussing a wide range of poems, stories and non-fiction at a level beyond that at which they can read independently.
  • Discussing the sequence of events in books and how items of information are related.
  • Becoming increasingly familiar with and retelling a wider range of stories, fairy stories and traditional tales.
  • Being introduced to non-fiction books that are structured in different ways.
  • Recognising simple recurring literary language in stories and poetry.
  • Discussing and clarifying the meanings of words, linking new meanings to known vocabulary.
  • Discussing their favourite words and phrases.
  • Continuing to build up a repertoire of poems learnt by heart, appreciating these and reciting some, with appropriate intonation to make the meaning clear.

Understand both the books that they can already read accurately and fluently and those that they listen to by:

  • Drawing on what they already know or on background information and vocabulary provided by the teacher.
  • Checking that the text makes sense as they read and correcting inaccurate reading.
  • Making inferences on the basis of what is being said and done.
  • Answering and asking questions.
  • Predicting what might happen on the basis of what has been read so far.

Participate in discussion about books, poems and other works that are read to them and those that they can read for themselves, taking turns and listening to what others say.

Explain and discuss their understanding of books, poems and other material, both those that they listen to and those that they read for themselves.

Skills in LKS2 will be introduced in Year 3 and revisited in Year 4 to provide children with the opportunity to master the skills taught before transitioning to UKS2.

Children should develop positive attitudes to reading and understanding of what they read by:

  • Listening to and discussing a wide range of fiction, poetry, plays, non-fiction and reference books or textbooks.
  • Reading books that are structured in different ways and reading for a range of purposes.
  • Using dictionaries to check the meaning of words that they have read.
  • Increasing their familiarity with a wide range of books, including fairy stories, myths and legends, and retelling some of these orally.
  • Identifying themes and conventions in a wide range of books.
  • Preparing poems and play scripts to read aloud and to perform, showing understanding through intonation, tone, volume and action.
  • Discussing words and phrases that capture the reader’s interest and imagination.
  • Recognising some different forms of poetry e.g. free verse, narrative

Understand what they read, in books that they read independently by:

  • Checking that the text makes sense to them, discussing their understanding and explaining the meaning of words in context.
  • Asking questions to improve their understanding of a text.
  • Drawing inferences such as inferring characters’ feelings, thought and motives from their actions, and justifying inferences with evidence.
  • Predicting what might happen from details stated and implied.
  • Identifying main ideas drawn from more than one paragraph and summarising these.
  • Identifying how language, structure and presentation contribute to meaning.

Retrieve and record information from non-fiction.

Participate in discussion about both books that are read to them and those they can read for themselves, taking turns and listening to what others say.

In Year 4 children will revisit the skills introduced in Year 3 to build confidence, independence and mastery.

Children should develop positive attitudes to reading and understanding of what they read by:

  • Listening to and discussing a wide range of fiction, poetry, plays, non-fiction and reference books or textbooks.
  • Reading books that are structured in different ways and reading for a range of purposes.
  • Using dictionaries to check the meaning of words that they have read.
  • Increasing their familiarity with a wide range of books, including fairy stories, myths and legends, and retelling some of these orally.
  • Identifying themes and conventions in a wide range of books.
  • Preparing poems and play scripts to read aloud and to perform, showing understanding through intonation, tone, volume and action.
  • Discussing words and phrases that capture the reader’s interest and imagination.
  • Recognising some different forms of poetry e.g. free verse, narrative

Understand what they read, in books that they read independently by:

  • Checking that the text makes sense to them, discussing their understanding and explaining the meaning of words in context.
  • Asking questions to improve their understanding of a text.
  • Drawing inferences such as inferring characters’ feelings, thought and motives from their actions, and justifying inferences with evidence.
  • Predicting what might happen from details stated and implied.
  • Identifying main ideas drawn from more than one paragraph and summarising these.
  • Identifying how language, structure and presentation contribute to meaning.

Retrieve and record information from non-fiction.

Participate in discussion about both books that are read to them and those they can read for themselves, taking turns and listening to what others say.

Skills in UKS2 will be introduced in Year 5 and revisited in Year 6 to provide children with the opportunity to master the skills taught before transitioning to UKS2.

Children should develop positive attitudes to reading and understanding of what they have read by:

  • Continuing to read and discuss an increasingly wide range of fiction, poetry, plays, non-fiction and reference books/textbooks.
  • Reading books that are structures in different ways and reading for a range of purposes.
  • Increasing their familiarity with a wide range of books, including myths, legends and traditional stories, modern fiction, fiction from our literary heritage, and books from other cultures and traditions.
  • Recommending books that they have read to their peers, giving reasons for their choices.
  • Identifying and discussing themes and conventions in and across a wide range of writing.
  • Making comparisons within and across books.
  • Learning a wider range of poetry by heart.
  • Preparing poems and plays to read aloud and to perform, showing understanding through intonation, tone and volume so that the meaning is clear to an audience.

Understand what they read by:

  • Checking that the book makes sense to them, discussing their understanding and exploring the meaning of words in context.
  • Asking questions to improve their understanding.
  • Drawing inferences such as inferring characters’ feelings, thoughts and motives from their actions, and justifying inferences with evidence.
  • Predicting what might happen from details stated and implied.
  • Summarising the main ideas drawn from more than one paragraph, identifying key details that support the main ideas.
  • Identifying how language, structure and presentation contribute to meaning.

Discuss and evaluate how authors use language, including figurative language, considering the impact on the reader.

Distinguish between statements of fact and opinion.

Retrieve, record and present information from non-fiction.

Participate in discussions about books that are read to them and those they can read for themselves, building on their own and others’ ideas and challenging views courteously.

Explain and discuss their understanding of what they have read, including through formal presentations and debates, maintaining a focus on the topic and using notes where necessary.

Provide reasoned justifications for their views.

In Year 6 children will revisit the skills introduced in Year 5 to build confidence, independence and mastery to ensure they are fully prepared for transition to secondary school.

Children should develop positive attitudes to reading and understanding of what they have read by:

  • Continuing to read and discuss an increasingly wide range of fiction, poetry, plays, non-fiction and reference books/textbooks.
  • Reading books that are structures in different ways and reading for a range of purposes.
  • Increasing their familiarity with a wide range of books, including myths, legends and traditional stories, modern fiction, fiction from our literary heritage, and books from other cultures and traditions.
  • Recommending books that they have read to their peers, giving reasons for their choices.
  • Identifying and discussing themes and conventions in and across a wide range of writing.
  • Making comparisons within and across books.
  • Learning a wider range of poetry by heart.
  • Preparing poems and plays to read aloud and to perform, showing understanding through intonation, tone and volume so that the meaning is clear to an audience.

Understand what they read by:

  • Checking that the book makes sense to them, discussing their understanding and exploring the meaning of words in context.
  • Asking questions to improve their understanding.
  • Drawing inferences such as inferring characters’ feelings, thoughts and motives from their actions, and justifying inferences with evidence.
  • Predicting what might happen from details stated and implied.
  • Summarising the main ideas drawn from more than one paragraph, identifying key details that support the main ideas.
  • Identifying how language, structure and presentation contribute to meaning.

Discuss and evaluate how authors use language, including figurative language, considering the impact on the reader.

Distinguish between statements of fact and opinion.

Retrieve, record and present information from non-fiction.

Participate in discussions about books that are read to them and those they can read for themselves, building on their own and others’ ideas and challenging views courteously.

Explain and discuss their understanding of what they have read, including through formal presentations and debates, maintaining a focus on the topic and using notes where necessary.

Provide reasoned justifications for their views.

EYFS KS1 KS2
To use their phonic knowledge to write words in ways that match their spoken sounds.

To write some irregular common words.

To develop their own narratives and explanations by connecting ideas or events.

To write simple sentences which can be read by themselves and others. Some words are spelt correctly and others are phonetically plausible.

To express themselves effectively, showing awareness of listeners’ needs.

To answer ‘how’ and ‘why’ questions about their experiences and in response to stories or events.

To use past, present and future forms accurately when talking about events that have happened or are going to happen in the future.

 

By the end of Key stage 1 all pupils should be able to:

  • Write simple, coherent narratives about personal experiences and those of others (real or fictional)
  • Write about real events, recording these simply and clearly
  • Demarcate most sentences in their writing with capital letters and full stops, and use question marks correctly when required
  • Use present and past tense mostly correctly and consistently
  • Use co-ordination (e.g. or / and / but) and some subordination (e.g. when / if / that / because) to join clauses
  • Segment spoken words into phonemes and represent these by graphemes, spelling many of these words correctly and making phonically-plausible attempts at others
  • Spell many common exception words
  • Form capital letters and digits of the correct size, orientation and relationship to one another and to lower-case letters
  • Use spacing between words that reflects the size of the letters

 

By the end of Key Stage 2 all pupils should be able to:

  • Write effectively for a range of purposes and audiences, selecting language that shows good awareness of the reader (e.g. the use of the first person in a diary; direct address in instructions and persuasive writing)
  • In narratives, describe settings, characters and atmosphere
  • Integrate dialogue in narratives to convey character and advance the action
  • Select vocabulary and grammatical structures that reflect what the writing requires, doing this mostly appropriately (e.g. using contracted forms in dialogues in narrative; using passive verbs to affect how information is presented; using modal verbs to suggest degrees of possibility)
  • Use a range of devices to build cohesion (e.g. conjunctions, adverbials of time and place, pronouns, synonyms) within and across paragraphs
  • Use verb tenses consistently and correctly throughout their writing
  • Use the range of punctuation taught at key stage 2 mostly correctly (e.g. inverted commas and other punctuation to indicate direct speech)
  • Spell correctly most words from the year 5 / year 6 spelling list, and use a dictionary to check the spelling of uncommon or more ambitious vocabulary
  • Maintain legibility in joined handwriting when writing at speed.

 

EYFS Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Year 6
To draw lines and circles using gross motor movements.

To use one-handed tools and equipment e.g. making snips in paper.

To hold a pencil near the point between their first two fingers and thumb and use it with good control.

To cope some letters e.g. letters from their name.

To give meaning to the marks they draw and paint.

To show preference for a dominant hand.

To begin to use anticlockwise movement and retrace vertical lines.

To use a pencil and hold it effectively to form recognizable letters, most of which are correctly formed.

To use some clearly identifiable letters to communicate meaning, representing some sounds correctly and in sequence.

To link sounds to letters, naming and sounding the letters of the alphabet.

To use their phonic knowledge to write words in ways that match their spoken sounds.

To write some irregular common words.

To spell words containing each of the 40+ phonemes already taught.

To spell common exceptions words, as detailed in the National Curriculum English Appendix 1, correctly.

To accurately spell the days of the week.

To be able to name the letters of the alphabet in order and to use letter names to be able to distinguish between alternative spellings of the same sound.

To be able to add prefixes and suffixes:

  • -s or -es
  • Un-
  • -ing, -ed, -er and -est

Apply simple spelling rules and guidance as listed in the National Curriculum English Appendix 1.

Write from memory simple sentences dictates by the teacher that include words using the GPCs and common exception words taught so far.

To sit correctly at a table, holding a pencil comfortably and correctly.

To begin to form lower-case letters in the correct direction, starting and finishing in the right place.

Form capital letters correctly.

Form digits 0-9 correctly.

To understand which letters belong to which handwriting families (letters that are formed in similar ways) and to practise these.

To spell by segmenting spoken words into phonemes and representing these by graphemes, spelling many correctly.

To learn new ways of spelling phonemes for which one or more spellings are already known, and learn some words with each spelling, including a few common homophones.

To spell common exceptions words, as detailed in the National Curriculum English Appendix 1, correctly.

Learn to spell an increasing number of words with contracted forms.

Learn how to use the singular possessive apostrophe.

To be able to distinguish between homophones and near-homophones.

To add suffices to spell longer words:

  • -ment
  • -ness
  • -ful
  • -less
  • -ly

To be able to apply spelling rules and guidance, as detailed in the National Curriculum English Appendix 1.

Write from memory simple sentences dictated by the teacher that include words using the GPCs, common exception words and punctuation taught so far.

Skills in LKS2 will be introduced in Year 3 and revisited in Year 4 to provide children with the opportunity to master the skills taught before transitioning to UKS2.

To use further prefixes and suffixes and understand how to add them as detailed in the National Curriculum English Appendix 1.

To be able to spell further homophones.

To be able to accurately spell words that are often misspelt.

Place the possessive apostrophe accurately in words with regular plurals e.g. girls’ and in words with irregular plural e.g. children’s.

Use the first two or three letters of a word to check its spelling in a dictionary.

Write from memory simple sentences, dictated by the teacher, that include words and punctuation taught so far.

To be able to use the diagonal and horizontal strokes that are needed to join letters and understand which letters, when adjacent to one another, are best left unjoined.

To improve the legibility, consistency and quality of their handwriting e.g. by ensuring that the downstrokes of letters are parallel and equidistant; that lines of writing a spaced sufficiently so that the ascenders and descenders of letters do not touch.

In Year 4 children will revisit the skills introduced in Year 3 to build confidence, independence and mastery.

To use further prefixes and suffixes and understand how to add them as detailed in the National Curriculum English Appendix 1.

To be able to spell further homophones.

To be able to accurately spell words that are often misspelt.

Place the possessive apostrophe accurately in words with regular plurals e.g. girls’ and in words with irregular plural e.g. children’s.

Use the first two or three letters of a word to check its spelling in a dictionary.

Write from memory simple sentences, dictated by the teacher, that include words and punctuation taught so far.

To be able to use the diagonal and horizontal strokes that are needed to join letters and understand which letters, when adjacent to one another, are best left unjoined.

To improve the legibility, consistency and quality of their handwriting e.g. by ensuring that the downstrokes of letters are parallel and equidistant; that lines of writing a spaced sufficiently so that the ascenders and descenders of letters do not touch.

 

Skills in UKS2 will be introduced in Year 5 and revisited in Year 6 to provide children with the opportunity to master the skills taught before transitioning to UKS2.

Children should be taught to use further prefixes and suffixes and understand the guidance for adding them.

Spell some words with silent letter e.g. knight

Continue to distinguish between homophones and other words which are often confused.

Use knowledge of morphology and etymology in spelling and understand that the spelling of some words needs to be learnt specifically, as listed in the National Curriculum English Appendix 1.

To use dictionaries to check the spelling and meaning of words.

To use a thesaurus.

To write legibly, fluently and with increasing speed by:

  • Choosing which shape of a letter to use when given choices and deciding whether or not to join specific letters.
  • Choosing the writing implement that is best suited for a task.
In Year 6 children will revisit the skills introduced in Year 5 to build confidence, independence and mastery to ensure they are fully prepared for transition to secondary school.

Children should be taught to use further prefixes and suffixes and understand the guidance for adding them.

Spell some words with silent letter e.g. knight

Continue to distinguish between homophones and other words which are often confused.

Use knowledge of morphology and etymology in spelling and understand that the spelling of some words needs to be learnt specifically, as listed in the National Curriculum English Appendix 1.

To use dictionaries to check the spelling and meaning of words.

To use the first three of four letters of a word to check spelling, meaning or both of these in a dictionary.

To use a thesaurus.

To write legibly, fluently and with increasing speed by:

  • Choosing which shape of a letter to use when given choices and deciding whether or not to join specific letters.
  • Choosing the writing implement that is best suited for a task.

EYFS Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Year 6
To speak to retell a simple past event in the correct order.

To use talk to connect ideas, explain what is happening and anticipate what might happen next, recall and live past experiences.

To use talk in pretending that objects stand for something else in play e.g. ‘this box is my castle’.

To engage in imaginative role play based on own first-hand experiences.

To build stories around toys e.g. farm animals needing rescue from an armchair ‘cliff’.

To capture experiences and responses with a range of media, such as music, dance and paint and other materials or words.

To link statements and stick to a main theme or intention.

To use talk to organise, sequence and clarify thinking, ideas, feelings and events.

To introduce a storyline or narrative into their play.

To write their own name and other things such as labels and captions.

To attempt to write short sentences in meaningful contexts.

To play cooperatively as part of a group to develop and act out a narrative.

To develop their own narratives and explanations by connecting ideas or events.

To write simple sentences which can be read by themselves and others. Some words are spelt correctly and others are phonetically plausible.

To use language to imagine and recreate roles and experiences in play situations.

To express themselves effectively, showing awareness of listeners’ needs.

To write sentences by:

  • Saying out loud what they are going to write about.
  • Composing a sentence orally before writing it.
  • Sequencing sentences to form short narratives.
  • Re-reading what have written to check that it makes sense.

Discuss what they have written with the teacher or other pupils.

Read aloud their writing clearly enough to be heard by their peers and the teacher.

 

To develop positive attitudes towards and stamina for writing by:

  • Writing narratives about personal experiences and those of others (real and fictional)
  • Writing about real events.
  • Writing poetry.
  • Writing for different purposes.

To consider what will be written beforehand beginning by:

  • Planning or saying out loud what they will write about.
  • Writing down ideas and/or key words, including new vocabulary.
  • Encapsulating what they want to say, sentence by sentence.

Make simple additions, revisions and corrections to their writing (editing) by:

  • Evaluating their writing with the teacher and other pupils.
  • Re-reading to check that their writing makes sense and that verbs to indicate time are used correctly and consistently, including verbs in the continuous form.
  • Proof-reading to check for errors in spelling, grammar and punctuation e.g. ends of sentences punctuated correctly.

Read aloud what they have written with appropriate intonation to make the meaning clear.

 

Skills in LKS2 will be introduced in Year 3 and revisited in Year 4 to provide children with the opportunity to master the skills taught before transitioning to UKS2.

To be able to plan writing by:

  • Discussing writing similar to that which they are planning to write in order to understand and learn from its structure, vocabulary and grammar.
  • Discussing and recording ideas.

To be able to draft and write by:

  • Composing and rehearsing sentences orally, progressively building a varied and rich vocabulary and an increasing range of sentence structures as detailed in the National Curriculum English Appendix 2.
  • Organising paragraphs around a theme.
  • In narratives, creating settings, characters and plot.
  • In non-narrative material, using simple organizational devices e.g. headings and sub-headings.

Evaluate and edit by:

  • Assessing the effectiveness of their own and others’ writing and suggesting improvements.
  • Proposing changes to grammar and vocabulary to improve consistency including the accurate use of pronouns in sentences.

Proof-read for spelling and punctuation errors.

Read aloud their own writing to a group or the whole class, using appropriate intonation and controlling the tone and volume so that the meaning is clear.

 

In Year 4 children will revisit the skills introduced in Year 3 to build confidence, independence and mastery.

To be able to plan writing by:

  • Discussing writing similar to that which they are planning to write in order to understand and learn from its structure, vocabulary and grammar.
  • Discussing and recording ideas.

To be able to draft and write by:

  • Composing and rehearsing sentences orally, progressively building a varied and rich vocabulary and an increasing range of sentence structures as detailed in the National Curriculum English Appendix 2.
  • Organising paragraphs around a theme.
  • In narratives, creating settings, characters and plot.
  • In non-narrative material, using simple organizational devices e.g. headings and sub-headings.

Evaluate and edit by:

  • Assessing the effectiveness of their own and others’ writing and suggesting improvements.
  • Proposing changes to grammar and vocabulary to improve consistency including the accurate use of pronouns in sentences.

Proof-read for spelling and punctuation errors.

Read aloud their own writing to a group or the whole class, using appropriate intonation and controlling the tone and volume so that the meaning is clear.

 

Skills in UKS2 will be introduced in Year 5 and revisited in Year 6 to provide children with the opportunity to master the skills taught before transitioning to UKS2.

 

To be able to plan writing by:

  • Identifying the audience for and purpose of the writing, selecting the appropriate form and using other similar writing as models for their own.
  • Noting and developing initial ideas, drawing on reading and research where necessary.
  • In writing narratives, considering how authors have developed characters and settings in what pupils have read, listened to or seen performed.

To be able to draft and write by:

  • Selecting appropriate grammar and vocabulary, understanding how such choices can change and enhance meaning.
  • In narratives, describing settings, characters and atmosphere and integrating dialogue to convey character and advance the action.
  • Précising longer passages.
  • Using a wide range of devices to build cohesion within and across paragraphs.
  • Using further organization and presentational devices to structure text and to guide the reader e.g. headings, bullet points, underlining.

Evaluate and edit by:

  • Assessing the effectiveness of their own and others’ writing.
  • Proposing changes to vocabulary, grammar and punctuation to enhance effects and clarify meaning.
  • Ensuring the consistent and correct use of tense throughout a piece of writing.
  • Ensuring correct subject and verb agreement when using singular and plural, distinguishing between the language of speech and writing and choosing the appropriate register.

Proof-read for spelling and punctuation errors.

Perform their own compositions, using appropriate intonation, volume and movement so that meaning is clear.

 

In Year 6 children will revisit the skills introduced in Year 5 to build confidence, independence and mastery to ensure they are fully prepared for transition to secondary school.

To be able to plan writing by:

  • Identifying the audience for and purpose of the writing, selecting the appropriate form and using other similar writing as models for their own.
  • Noting and developing initial ideas, drawing on reading and research where necessary.
  • In writing narratives, considering how authors have developed characters and settings in what pupils have read, listened to or seen performed.

To be able to draft and write by:

  • Selecting appropriate grammar and vocabulary, understanding how such choices can change and enhance meaning.
  • In narratives, describing settings, characters and atmosphere and integrating dialogue to convey character and advance the action.
  • Précising longer passages.
  • Using a wide range of devices to build cohesion within and across paragraphs.
  • Using further organization and presentational devices to structure text and to guide the reader e.g. headings, bullet points, underlining.

Evaluate and edit by:

  • Assessing the effectiveness of their own and others’ writing.
  • Proposing changes to vocabulary, grammar and punctuation to enhance effects and clarify meaning.
  • Ensuring the consistent and correct use of tense throughout a piece of writing.
  • Ensuring correct subject and verb agreement when using singular and plural, distinguishing between the language of speech and writing and choosing the appropriate register.

Proof-read for spelling and punctuation errors.

Perform their own compositions, using appropriate intonation, volume and movement so that meaning is clear.

 

EYFS Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Year 6
To begin to use more complex sentences to link thoughts when speaking e.g. using ‘and’ and ‘because’.

To show an understanding of prepositions, such as ‘under’, ‘on top’, ‘behind’ by carrying out an action or selecting a correct picture.

To question why things happen and give explanations and ask questions e.g. who, what, when, how.

To use a range of tenses in speech e.g. play, playing, will play, played.

To answer ‘how’ and ‘why’ questions about their experiences and in response to stories or events.

To use past, present and future forms accurately when talking about events that have happened or are going to happen in the future.

Children should develop their understanding of the concepts set out in the National Curriculum English Appendix 2 by:

  • Leaving spaces between words.
  • Joining words and clauses using ‘and’.
  • Beginning to punctuate sentences using a capital letter and a full stop, question mark or exclamation mark.
  • Using a capital letter for names of people, places, the days of the week and the personal pronoun ‘I’.
  • Learning the grammar for Year 1 in the National Curriculum Appendix 2.

Use the grammatical terminology in the National Curriculum English Appendix 2 in discussing their writing.

Children should develop their understanding of the concepts set out in the National Curriculum English Appendix 2 by:

  • Learning how to use both familiar and new punctuation correctly, including full stops, capital letters, exclamation marks, question marks, commas in a list and apostrophes for contracted forms and singular possession.

 

Learn how to use:

  • Sentences with different forms: statement, question, exclamation, command.
  • Expanded noun phrases to describe and specify.
  • Present and past tenses correctly and consistently, including the progressive form.
  • Subordination and coordination.
  • Some features of written Standard English.
  • The grammar for Year 2 in the National Curriculum English Appendix 2.
Skills in LKS2 will be introduced in Year 3 and revisited in Year 4 to provide children with the opportunity to master the skills taught before transitioning to UKS2.

 

Children should develop their understanding of the concepts set out in the National Curriculum English Appendix 2 by:

  • Extending the range of sentences with more than one clause by using a wider range of conjunctions, including when, if, because, although.
  • Using the present perfect form of verbs in contrast to the past tense.
  • Choosing nouns or pronouns appropriately for clarity and cohesion and to avoid repetition.
  • Using conjunctions, adverbs and prepositions to express time and cause.
  • Using fronted adverbials.
  • Learning the grammar for Year 3 and 4 as detailed in the National Curriculum English Appendix 2.

 

Indicate grammatical and other features by:

  • Using commas after fronted adverbials.
  • Indicating possession by using the possessive apostrophe for plural nouns.
  • Using and punctuating direct speech.

 

Use and understand the grammatical terminology as detailed in the National Curriculum English Appendix 2.

 

In Year 4 children will revisit the skills introduced in Year 3 to build confidence, independence and mastery.

Children should develop their understanding of the concepts set out in the National Curriculum English Appendix 2 by:

  • Extending the range of sentences with more than one clause by using a wider range of conjunctions, including when, if, because, although.
  • Using the present perfect form of verbs in contrast to the past tense.
  • Choosing nouns or pronouns appropriately for clarity and cohesion and to avoid repetition.
  • Using conjunctions, adverbs and prepositions to express time and cause.
  • Using fronted adverbials.
  • Learning the grammar for Year 3 and 4 as detailed in the National Curriculum English Appendix 2.

 

Indicate grammatical and other features by:

  • Using commas after fronted adverbials.
  • Indicating possession by using the possessive apostrophe for plural nouns.
  • Using and punctuating direct speech.

 

Use and understand the grammatical terminology as detailed in the National Curriculum English Appendix 2.

 

Skills in UKS2 will be introduced in Year 5 and revisited in Year 6 to provide children with the opportunity to master the skills taught before transitioning to UKS2.

 

To develop their understanding of the concepts set out in the National Curriculum English Appendix 2 by:

  • Recognising vocabulary and structures that are appropriate for formal speech and writing, including subjunctive forms.
  • Using passive verbs to affect the presentation of information in a sentence.
  • Using the perfect form of verbs to mark relationships of time and cause.
  • Using expanded noun phrases to convey complicated information concisely.
  • Using modal verbs or adverbs to indicate degrees of possibility.
  • Using relative clauses beginning with who, which, where, when, whose, that or with an implied relative pronoun.
  • Learning the grammar for Years 5 and 6 as detailed in the National Curriculum English Appendix 2.

Indicate grammatical and other features by:

  • Using commas to clarify meaning or avoid ambiguity in writing.
  • Using hyphens to avoid ambiguity.
  • Using brackets, dashes or commas to indicate parenthesis.
  • Using semi-colons, colons or dashes to mark boundaries between independent clauses.
  • Using a colon to introduce a list.
  • Punctuating bullet points consistently.

Use and understand the grammatical terminology as detailed in the National Curriculum English Appendix 2 accurately and appropriately in discussing their reading and writing.

 

In Year 6 children will revisit the skills introduced in Year 5 to build confidence, independence and mastery to ensure they are fully prepared for transition to secondary school.

To develop their understanding of the concepts set out in the National Curriculum English Appendix 2 by:

  • Recognising vocabulary and structures that are appropriate for formal speech and writing, including subjunctive forms.
  • Using passive verbs to affect the presentation of information in a sentence.
  • Using the perfect form of verbs to mark relationships of time and cause
  • Using expanded noun phrases to convey complicated information concisely.
  • Using modal verbs or adverbs to indicate degrees of possibility.
  • Using relative clauses beginning with who, which, where, when, whose, that or with an implied relative pronoun.
  • Learning the grammar for Years 5 and 6 as detailed in the National Curriculum English Appendix 2.

Indicate grammatical and other features by:

  • Using commas to clarify meaning or avoid ambiguity in writing.
  • Using hyphens to avoid ambiguity.
  • Using brackets, dashes or commas to indicate parenthesis.
  • Using semi-colons, colons or dashes to mark boundaries between independent clauses.
  • Using a colon to introduce a list.
  • Punctuating bullet points consistently.

Use and understand the grammatical terminology as detailed in the National Curriculum English Appendix 2 accurately and appropriately in discussing their reading and writing.

Enrichment Activities
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